Always Well Within

Calm Your Mind, Ease Your Heart, Embrace Your Inner Wisdom

Author: Sandra Pawula (Page 3 of 98)

12 Things You Cling To That Block Your Inner Peace

A guest post by Steve Waller.

Take a deep breath and try to hold it for as long as you can.

Go on… do it now.

The longer you go, the harder it becomes. Not only does it begin to hurt physically, you have to fight against your natural urge to release the breath; to let go.

A single breath, when held for too long, symbolizes one of the biggest psychological and spiritual challenges we face as beings of consciousness. It captures the desire almost all of us have to cling on to something for fear of losing it, even when it is to our own detriment.

In Buddhism, it’s known as upādāna which literally translates as fuel. This clinging is the fuel for dukkha, another Buddhist term that means suffering. So the more you cling to things, the more you fuel your own suffering.

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How to Go from Discouraged to Empowered in a Scary World


Do you worry about the explosion of fear and violence around the world today?  It might seem like there’s no way out – the human race will implode, destroying everything else along with it.  In this scenario, attempts to foster love, compassion, tolerance and other spiritual values seem futile.

The humanitarian leader and spiritual teacher Sri Prem Baba sees the world differently.  He says we’re in the midst of a planet-wide transition from fear to trust, from isolation to union, from hatred to love.  If you were able to look through the eyes of spirit, you would see an increase in light in our world.

Prem Baba uses the metaphor of being asleep in a dark room to help us understand the outbreaks of needless violence that shock us again and again.

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7 Top Books That Will Help You Heal Trauma 

7 tops books on trauma

Trauma is far more common than you might imagine, both development trauma, which originates in childhood, and shock trauma, which occurs in response to an overwhelming event that occurs at any time during your life.  You may not even realize how the imprints of trauma silently direct your life because trauma sometimes remains hidden within your unconscious mind.

These statistics on abuse begin to illuminate the scope of the problem, and they do not include the emotional damage that occurs from development trauma, which can occur from not having your emotional needs meant during your early years.

Research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has shown that one in five Americans was sexually molested as a child; one in four was beaten by a parent to the point of a mark being left on their body; and one in three couples engages in physical violence.  A quarter of us grew up with alcoholic relatives, and one out of eight witnessed their mother being beaten or hit.

Let’s look at the difference between developmental trauma and shock trauma, so we can better understand our own emotional wounds and also extend a hand to others who have been impacted by trauma.

Developmental Trauma and Shock Trauma: What’s the Difference?

You may associate trauma with catastrophic events, but a different form of trauma, developmental trauma, can occur early childhood.  Both types of trauma can effect your capacity for nervous system regulation.

Developmental trauma ranges from not getting your basic emotional needs met during specific stages of childhood development to full-on abuse or neglect, often called C-PTSD or Complex PTSD.  Complex PTSD may also involve misattunement and/or shock trauma as described below.

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17 Powerful Byron Katie Quotes That Will Breakthrough Your Pain

Byron Katie Quotes

These 17 quotes from Byron Katie’s new book, A Mind At Home With Itself, have challenged my difficult thoughts in the best possible way.  Reading this book inspired me to let go of painful thoughts that have kept me in a cycle of grief and anger for months.

But “I” didn’t have to let go.  The books seemed to contain a magic that released the thoughts for me.  Or, deeply inspired, maybe I momentarily let go of the “I” that had been clinging to this particular pain for too long.  In its place, I found joy.

A Mind At Home With Itself is Byron Katie’s commentary on the “Diamond Sutra,” one of the great spiritual texts of all time. This sutra addresses the idea of “no-self,” a fundamental principle in Buddhism.  This mind-boggling idea is contrary to the conditioning we receive in the West, which encourages us to solidify the sense of “I” through competition, success, and consumerism.

In this commentary, Katie makes the shocking idea of “no-self” a bit more user friendly.  And, she provides a method, called “The Work,” to help you actualize the experience of living without a solidified sense of self.

Here’s the truth, you can’t find true happiness as long as you cling to your thoughts, emotions, or sense of a solidified self.  So although you may have no reference point for some of the ideas in these quotes, keep an open mind.   Katie provides a clear path to help you break through your emotional pain.  And isn’t that what we all want?

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How to Reclaim Your Calm When Life Feels Chaotic

Reclaim Your Inner Calm

Do you long for equanimity? I do, but these days I find calm hard to come by.  The world around me, right now, teems with anxiety, anger, and fear, which understandably stirs me up too.

For example, I embroiled myself in a contentious debate on the internet yesterday morning.  An hour later, my acupuncturist told me my liver meridian, the one associated with anger, displayed signs of imbalance — partially acute, partially chronic.

The body doesn’t lie, does it?  While you might charge forward to your next activity, unless processed, anger can penetrate and accumulate in your physical being.

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33 Powerful Morning Mantras That Will Transform Your Day

Morning Mantras

Every morning, I choose a word or phrase, a “mantra,” to guide my day.  My daily mantra keeps me tuned into my most important emotional, mental, and spiritual priorities for the next 24 hours.

It also sets the tone for the day.  If life feels frazzled, my mantra reminds me to breathe, relax, or rest.  If I’m feeling unsure, it encourages me to embrace my authority.  If I’m distracted, it nudges me to return to the present moment.

I need more than a single word or phrase of the year because I constantly change as does the world around me.  The perfect personal message on a peaceful day will not necessarily suit me on a chaotic day.

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