Always Well Within

Calm Your Mind, Ease Your Heart, Embrace Your Inner Wisdom

21 Inspirational Quotations on Happiness, Hope, and the Power of Mind from the Dalai Lama


The Dalai Lama is one of the most beloved world leaders alive today. His tireless commitment to encouraging basic human values like kindness, compassion, forgiveness, contentment, tolerance and self-discipline make him a popular speaker wherever he goes.

Isn’t this a sign that we’re all longing for a peaceful and happy life?

Although no stranger to tragedy, The Dalai tells us that he is fundamentally a happy person. His radiant smile and warm-hearted presence demonstrates the fact.  There is so much we can learn about true happiness from the Dalai Lama!

Here are 21 inspirational quotations from this great advocate of peace to inspire your quest for happiness, hope and harmony.

  • “The ultimate source of a happy life is warm-heartedness. This means extending to others the kind of concern we have for ourselves. On a simple level we find that if we have a compassionate heart we naturally have more friends. And scientists today are discovering that while anger and hatred eat into our immune system, warm-heartedness and compassion are good for our health.”

  • “A compassionate community will not be achieved only through prayer; I pray myself, but I accept its limitations. We need to take action to develop compassion, to create inner peace within ourselves and to share that inner peace with our family and friends. Peace and warm-heartedness can then spread through the community just as ripples radiate out across the water when you drop a pebble into a pond.”
  • “In the past, destruction of your neighbour might have been considered a victory, but today we are all interdependent. We live in a global economy; we face problems like climate change that affect us all. The 7 billion human beings alive today belong to one human family. In the context that others’ interests are in our interest and our interest is in their interest, the use of force is self-destructive.”
  • “To be contented human beings we need trust and friendship, which tends to develop much better once we realise that all beings have a right to happiness, just as we do. Taking others’ interests into account not only helps them, it also helps us. Warm-heartedness and concern for others are a part of human nature and are at the core of positive human values.”
  • “Everyone wants a happy life without difficulties or suffering. We create many of the problems we face. No one intentionally creates problems, but we tend to be slaves to powerful emotions like anger, hatred and attachment that are based on misconceived projections about people and things. We need to find ways of reducing these emotions by eliminating the ignorance that underlies them and applying opposing forces.”
  • “While murder, bullying, exploitation and scandal regularly make news, when thousands of children receive their mother’s care and affection every day it isn’t reported because we take it for granted. We may be subject to negative emotions, but it’s possible to keep them under control, to cultivate a sense of emotional hygiene, on the basis of human values that are rooted in that affection – what I call secular ethics.”
  • “Nowadays, we are confronted by a huge gap between rich and poor. This is not only morally wrong, but practically a mistake. It leads to the rich living in anxiety and the poor living in frustration, which has the potential to lead to more violence. We have to work to reduce this gap. It’s truly unfair that some people should have so much while others go hungry.”
  • “If we make consistent effort, based on proper education, we can change the world. We are selfish, that’s natural, but we need to be wisely selfish, not foolishly selfish. We have to concern ourselves more with others’ well-being, that’s the way to be wisely selfish. We have the ability to take the long-term benefit into account. I think it is possible to make real change in this century.”
  • “We need to understand the inadequacy of an educational system so slanted towards material values. The solution is not to give an occasional lecture, but to integrate ethics into the educational curriculum. To do this effectively requires a secular ethics, free of religious influence, based on common sense, a realistic view and scientific findings.”
  • “All living beings have experience of pleasure and pain, and we are among them. What makes human beings different is that we have a powerful intelligence and a much greater ability to achieve happiness and avoid suffering. Real happiness and friendship come not from money or even knowledge, but from warm-heartedness. Once we recognise this we will be more inclined to cultivate it.”
  • “As social animals a key factor to our living a happy life is friendship, trust and openness. We are all the same as members of one human family. Trust is the basis of friendship and we’ll find this if, in addition to the knowledge we gain from ordinary education, we develop warm-heartedness. This gives rise to self-confidence and inner strength, which through trust and friendship leads to co-operation with others.”
  • “Whether we consider the individual, family, local, national or international level, peace must arise from inner peace. For example, making prayers for peace while continuing to harbor anger is futile. Training the mind and overcoming your anger is much more effective than mere prayer. Anger, hatred and jealousy never solve problems, only affection, concern and respect can do that.”
  • “My dedication is to serve the 7 billion human beings on this planet and the other creatures with whom we share it. If you can, help and serve others, but if you can’t at least don’t harm them; then in the end you will feel no regret.”
  • “These days, in our materialistic culture, many people are led to believe that money is the ultimate source of happiness. Consequently, when they don’t have enough of it they feel let down. Therefore, it is important to let people know that they have the source of contentment and happiness within themselves, and that it is related to nurturing our natural inner values.”
  • “We have to think and see how we can fundamentally change our education system so that we can train people to develop warm-heartedness early on in order to create a healthier society. I don’t mean we need to change the whole system, just improve it. We need to encourage an understanding that inner peace comes from relying on human values like, love, compassion, tolerance and honesty, and that peace in the world relies on individuals finding inner peace.”
  • “The great benefit of science is that it can make a tremendous contribution to the alleviation of suffering on a physical level, but it is only by cultivating the qualities of the human heart and transforming our attitudes that we can begin to address and overcome our mental suffering. We need both, since the alleviation of suffering must take place on both a physical and a psychological level.”
  • “Happiness arises as a result of different causes and conditions. If you harm someone out of anger, you may feel some superficial satisfaction, but deep down you know it was wrong. Your confidence will be undermined. However, if you have an altruistic attitude, you’ll feel comfortable and confident in the presence of others.”
  • “The ultimate source of a happy life is warm-heartedness. This means extending to others the kind of concern we have for ourselves. On a simple level we find that if we have a compassionate heart we naturally have more friends. And scientists today are discovering that while anger and hatred eat into our immune system, warm-heartedness and compassion are good for our health.”
  • “Those who have little interest in spirituality shouldn’t think that human inner values don’t apply to you. The inner peace of an alert and calm mind are the source of real happiness and good health. Our human intelligence tells us which of our emotions are positive and helpful and which are damaging and to be restrained or avoided.”
  • “By implementing the practice of love and compassion, we will naturally live a non-violent way of life. Helping others and not harming them is the work of non-violence. We need to develop love, compassion and forgiveness to develop inner peace and that naturally gives rise to non-violent conduct.”
  • “However capable and skillful an individual may be, left alone, he or she will not survive. When we are sick or very young or very old, we must depend on the support of others. There is no significant division between us and other people, because our basic natures are the same. If we wish to ensure everyone’s peace and happiness we need to cultivate a healthy respect for the diversity of our peoples and cultures, founded on an understanding of this fundamental sameness of all human beings.”
  • “There are two kinds of happiness – the temporary pleasure derived primarily from material comfort alone and another more enduring comfort that results from the thorough transformation and development of the mind. We can see in our own lives that the latter form of happiness is superior because when our mental state is calm and happy, we can easily put up with minor pains and physical discomforts. On the other hand, when our mind is restless and upset, the most comfortable physical facilities do not make us happy.”
  • “Comparing the 20th century to now there are many hopeful signs. Look at the way people view war. These days many people challenge the need for it, they question why we have to resort to it. In the early twentieth century there was no talk about protecting the environment, yet now everyone is aware of it. Our perceptions are coming closer to reality; humanity is becoming more mature and I am optimistic about the future.”

Did you notice the number of times the Dalai Lama uses the word “warm-heartedness?”  A good heart is surely the foundation of happiness.

There is so much to reflect upon here.  You could take one quote a day to use as a morning contemplation and then let it infuse your day with warmth and wisdom.

Like the Dalai Lama’s Facebook Page for regular doses of joyful intelligence.

What stood out for you in these quotations?

I’m so glad you’re here! If you’re, please consider subscribing for free updates by email. And, if you have an extra moment, please help spread the goodness on social media – it makes a huge difference.  Thank you!  With love, Sandra




How to Find Time to De-Stress


Flipping The Switch: Materialist To Minimalist


  1. Love this post. The two kinds of happiness (near the end) stand out for me. It all begins with the state of our mind.
    I also love this line: …”only by cultivating the qualities of the human heart and transforming our attitudes that we can begin to address and overcome our mental suffering.”
    Thanks for this great post. Very enlightening (no pun intended!).

    • Hi Harriet,
      Differentiating between the two kinds of happiness is so crucial. I believe we can only find true happiness when we draw a line between the two. I agree, the Dalai Lama is enlightening in all ways! Thanks for your appreciation.

  2. Hi Sandra
    I love this piece and you taking the time to write it in a beautiful way. There is no wonder that Watkins Book named the Dalai Lama as number 1 in their top 100 spiritually influencial person of 2013 as seen in my blog

  3. I am a big fan of quotes and oh, the Dalai Lama is absolutely one of my favorite personalities. My favorite? “Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible”.

    Thank you for such an inspiring post, Sandra.

    Loved it.

  4. This post just fills me with happiness Sandra. What an amazing being he is. The quote that sums it up for me is the one about developing love and compassion…for ourselves and others. What an even more amazing world this would be if this were our focus.


    • I love knowing this post fills you with happiness, Ellen. You are already quite a happy person so you must really be brimming over now. 🙂 I agree, we all have love and compassion in our heart underneath all the layers of confusion. If we all really knew and believed that it would be such a different world indeed!

Comments are closed.

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén